Monday, November 30, 2015

Diabetes Radio

Christel Marchand Aprigliano was a speaker on a radio show called Through The Eyes Of Women. She did an excellent job speaking for 30 minutes about diabetes in an interview. Christel is a very dynamic advocate for all people with diabetes. You can read the interview, or listen to the radio broadcast with the links below.

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Thanksgiving Poem

TWAS THE NIGHT OF THANKSGIVING,
BUT I JUST COULDN'T SLEEP.
I TRIED COUNTING BACKWARDS,
I TRIED COUNTING SHEEP.
THE LEFTOVERS BECKONED -
THE DARK MEAT AND WHITE,
BUT I FOUGHT THE TEMPTATION
WITH ALL OF MY MIGHT.
TOSSING AND TURNING WITH ANTICIPATION,
THE THOUGHT OF A SNACK BECAME INFATUATION.
SO, I RACED TO THE KITCHEN, FLUNG OPEN THE DOOR,
AND GAZED AT THE FRIDGE, FULL OF GOODIES GALORE.
GOBBLED UP TURKEY AND BUTTERED POTATOES,
PICKLES AND CARROTS, BEANS AND TOMATOES.
I FELT MYSELF SWELLING SO PLUMP AND SO ROUND,
'TIL ALL OF A SUDDEN, I ROSE OFF THE GROUND.
I CRASHED THROUGH THE CEILING, FLOATING INTO THE SKY,
WITH A MOUTHFUL OF PUDDING AND A HANDFUL OF PIE.
BUT, I MANAGED TO YELL AS I SOARED PAST THE TREES....
HAPPY EATING TO ALL - PASS THE CRANBERRIES, PLEASE.
MAY YOUR STUFFING BE TASTY,
MAY YOUR TURKEY BE PLUMP.
MAY YOUR POTATOES 'N GRAVY HAVE NARY A LUMP.
MAY YOUR YAMS BE DELICIOUS.
MAY YOUR PIES TAKE THE PRIZE,
MAY YOUR THANKSGIVING DINNER STAY OFF OF YOUR THIGHS!!
HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO ALL!!!

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Side Effects Of Our Meds

Side Effects Of Our Medications
My problem with some of my meds is that the side effects include dizziness. I started BP medication many years ago to provide protection for my kidneys, even though I did not have high BP. A few years later, my BP was rather high, so my doctor gave me a much higher dosage. Then I started having dizziness, really bad. I was falling down in the morning on some days. I started taking half doses of that med a month before my next appointment, and I did not fall down anymore. The doctor wrote a new prescription, and my BP was okay.
There is still dizziness, and that is very aggravating. I have two other meds that have 'DIZZINESS' in big letters written on the container. I cut the dosage for hydrochlorizide in half, and my liquid retention problem is still good. There is still dizziness, but not as bad.
I also started having aching muscles and a lot of fatigue when I started my cholesterol med (a statin). It reduced my overall cholesterol from 280+ to 130+ so I have not cut that dosage, but maybe I should. Maybe an over all of 180-200 would be okay, if it gave me more energy and less aching?
Do you have side effects with your meds? Did you request a reduced dosage, or an alternate med? Some people completely stop certain meds if the side effects are worse than the protection provided.

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Big Blue Test

I hope that the people who visit this page are participating in the Big Blue Test. The project continues through Nov 30. Every time you take the 'test' a dollar is contributed to diabetes charities.

http://bigbluetest.org/meet-our-grantees/?utm_source=BBT+post-WDD+2015&utm_campaign=2014+BBT+Ginger&utm_medium=email

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Judge Rules CGM Coverage

Have you seen this? A judge has ordered Medicare must cover a CGM for a T1D patient. If this works, it would be a ground breaking event.

http://www.medpagetoday.com/PublicHealthPolicy/Medicare/54785

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Ditching Your Pump?

Riva Greenberg has posted an excellent discussion on why some people do not want a pump, and prefer injections. That happens rather frequently. I am very glad I chose to use a pump, and that my insurance covers pumps and pump supply expenses. I have much better control, with fewer lows and highs since I started pumping eight years ago. I have not needed assistance with a hypo since July, 2007. A pump is the best choice, for me. It may not be the best choice for you.

http://insulinnation.com/devices/pumps-cgm/5-reasons-people-ditch-pump/

Sunday, November 15, 2015

World Diabetes Day

I keep thinking about the millions of type 1 people who would have perished if Drs. Frederick Banting and Charles Best had not discovered insulin 93 years ago. November 14 was Dr. Banting's birthday.That is truly a day to be celebrated!!





Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Medicare & CGM Coverage

The Medicare CGM Act of 2015 bill has added 114 House and 25 Senate co-sponsors since June 1. The focus is not on diabetes, but diabetes has not gone away. Many senior citizens have hypo unawareness, and a CGM can be very helpful!! Please click on the link below and contact your representatives and stress the importance of CGM coverage for millions of diabetics in the US.

http://diabetespac.org/app/write-a-letter?0&engagementId=100459

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Bionic Pancreas is now the iLET

The Bionic Pancreas is renamed as the iLET for automating diabetes care. Mike Hoskins gives us the info on Diabetes Mine.

Monday, November 9, 2015

Bionic Pancreas Update


The Bionic Pancreas is a single device that determines your blood sugar, and gives you insulin or glucose when needed, without you having to test. Kerri Sparling gives us an update on this device, and tells us about the intended human trials for 2016. This is very exciting!!

http://sixuntilme.com/wp/2015/11/06/bionic-pancreas-update-call-action/?utm_content=buffer523a3&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin.com&utm_campaign=bufferer

Saturday, November 7, 2015

Diabetes...Past, Present and Future

The author of this article in 2013 is Roberta Kleinman, RN, M.Ed., CDE
Each year, the month of November is designated as Diabetes month. Many of you do not have the luxury of focusing on diabetes only one month a year since it never takes a break. I wanted to share some statistics and interesting information which may spike your interest in learning more about diabetes- then, now and in the future.
PAST:
Diabetes has been recognized by the ancient Egyptians' for over 3000 years. Hesa-Ra, an Egyptian physician described the first symptoms which included increased urination and severe emaciation.
Sushruta and Charaka, two physicians from India described the initial differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. They thought type 1 was related to only the young and type 2 was related to weight. We now know this is not true.
Doctors in the 1800's understood the need for treatment of diabetes and created tests using chemicals to check for sugary urine. Prior to that in the 1700s there were actual tasters who tasted urine to check for sugar content. Even then physicians recognized the need for exercise and improved eating habits as treatment for diabetes.
Oskar Minkowky and Joseph Von Mering, two researchers from France removed a dog's pancreas which brought on diabetes. They connected insulin with treatment for diabetes.
In 1916 - Elliot Joslin MD, a scientist from Boston wrote the first text book for the management of diabetes called The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus. He focused on a fasting diet and regular exercise. He is often considered the father of diabetes and The Joslin Clinic in Boston still exists today. They lead the way in diabetes treatment.
1921 - Dr. Banting and his assistant Dr. Best injected pancreatic extract - insulin from a canine to treat diabetes in a dog. It was then refined to help a young boy suffering from diabetes. They received the Nobel Prize in medicine.
1940s - Intermediate insulin called NPH was developed by Novo Nordisk.
1942 - The sulfonylurea pills were developed to push out insulin from one's own pancreas. This was the first type of oral diabetes medication. They are currently prescribed less due to cardiac side effects.
1969 - The original glucose meter was created for hospital use weighing 3 pounds and costing $650.
1970s - The first insulin pump was made to mimic how the body naturally releases insulin.
1979 - The A1C test was developed and is used to monitor diabetes control. It is now considered one method of diagnosing diabetes. Metformin was created in France and was brought to the U.S. in 1994. It remains the first line of oral medication in type 2 diabetes today.
1981 - The first home use glucose meters were offered. Shortly after Humulin [developed by Genentech] became the first biosynthetic insulin.
1993 - Large studies including the Diabetes Prevention Trial, Dream study and Act Now have all proven that if blood sugars are maintained at an A1C level of 7% or less, complications of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy are less likely to occur. Check with your physician to see what A1C level is appropriate for you.
1996 - Fast acting insulin was released by Eli Lilly. This added more flexibility to meal timing.
PRESENT:
The diabetes numbers from 2011 have not yet been updated but we do know these numbers have already increased in 2013. 26 million people in the U.S. have diabetes (type 1 or 2) and 7 million are unaware of it. The criterion includes a fasting blood sugar of 126mg/dl - two times /an A1C of 6.5% or a glucose tolerance test over 200mg/dl. Only 50% of people experience symptoms of diabetes. 79 million people in the U.S. have pre-diabetes which is a blood sugar of 100-125 mg/dl - if not corrected by life style changes will usually result in type 2 diabetes. 8.3% of the population has diabetes.
There is a genetic predisposition in both type 1 and 2 diabetes but stronger in type 2. Type 1 is still considered a virus or an auto immune response. 5% accounts for type 1 and 95% accounts for type 2.
The highest levels are seen in minorities such as Hispanics (13.8%), African Americans (18%), American Indian and Native Alaskan (16.1%) compared to Caucasians (10%).
Diabetes costs in 2012 were $245 billion. $176 billion were direct medical costs and $69 billion were in decreased productivity.
Diabetes complications - cost $5.4 billion for hospital in patients per year.
Diabetes is the 16th most expensive chronic condition in the U.S. today.
1 in 3 American adults will develop diabetes in 2050 if the present trends continue.
Most insurance plans including Medicare provide diabetes management training skills to all patients with diabetes. A prescription is needed by your physician. Request it if it is not offered to you since it is proven that education can help you get better control.
There are present medical treatments with fewer side effects. There are pills which target your kidneys, superficial fat, and brain as well as gut hormones. They rarely cause hypoglycemia or weight gain. There are new injectables other then insulin which can assist weight loss as well as lower blood sugars.
Recent reports from the European Association for Study of Diabetes stated that due to improved management of people with type 1 diabetes (last 20 years) life spans have significantly increased.
There has never been a better time to manage your diabetes due to research, new medications and advanced technology along with the old fashioned life style changes!
FUTURE:
Technology will remain huge in the future of diabetes. We already have continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and pump therapy but research continues to search for the artificial pancreas.
Inter Med patient handler - receives glucose readings wirelessly and transmits to a central server. The software evaluates and analyzes the information and sends a report to you and your provider.
The ultimate goal for scientists today is a complete cure. More personalized treatment will be available including mapping your own genetics.
I-pancreas is being developed which will fully automate blood glucose control.
Weight loss surgery will continue to evolve as a treatment and possible cure for type 2 diabetes. By decreasing the fat levels in the organs the liver and pancreas seem to return to normal function. More time and research will tell us how long these benefits will last.
Glucose sensing car- This is presently in development. An alarm will sound if blood sugars drop. A CGM worn by the patient transmits readings to a micro chip in the dash board.
Research is currently being done on new inhaled insulin- Afrezza- ultra rapid meal time insulin. It will be smaller in size and have fewer side effects on the lungs. They continue to work on a pill form of insulin which will not be destroyed by saliva.
There is so much to look forward to in the world of diabetes and the treatments. Stay informed. Diabetes month is a time to celebrate the advances in diabetes care but please stay involved all year long!

Friday, November 6, 2015

Moms and Their Type 1 Kids

For diabetes awareness month. The following account echoes my mom's feelings when she was my caretaker in my early years with T1D, starting in 1945.
Written by Rosalin Midgeley
"I remember when diabetes was just a word, when I could give you whatever you wanted to eat without thinking about carb counting and sugar content.
I remember that carefree smile you used to have, the spontaneous play you used to enjoy without having to test your blood to check if your levels are high enough to enjoy it or so low you have to sit and watch while you have something to eat.
I remember days out and holidays when we could just pile into the car and go, not have to make sure you have your insulin, testing kit and enough snacks and hypo food.
I remember reading you a bedtime story and the scariest part were the goblins and dragons in the books, now its a monster called diabetes and his henchmen ketones and hypos that keep me awake to make sure they don't pay you a visit in the night.
I remember the day you were diagnosed, the fear in your eyes etched into my memory.
I remember you screaming you were sorry for being scared while I helped to hold you down for blood tests and a drip.
I remember how very brave you were when you realized you had to inject for the rest of your life.
I remember the first time you went to school with it, I had to hand your life over to someone who only had my written instructions to help keep you alive.
I remember how scared I was to let you do things other kids do like go to parties and ride your bikes at the park.
I remember how proud I am to be your mom each time someone says you can't do that, your a diabetic and you go ahead and do it and succeed.
I am so proud of all of you for learning to live with your diabetes and not letting it hold you back!
I look forward to all the years we will share and all the wonderful things you will achieve!
What I look forward to the most is a cure! There will be one and it will be for you!

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Patient Advocacy for Type 1 Diabetes

https://myglu.org/articles/patient-advocacy-amplifying-the-voices-of-t1d-to-affect-change

Sunday, November 1, 2015

JDRF....Type 1 Diabetes Month

November is the official month for diabetes. Blue is our color, and JDRF is our organization. Let's make type 1 become type none!
Type 1 for 70 years, but looking forward to new horizons, new technology, and a brighter future for all people with diabetes. 



What Is Insulin Resistance?

What is insulin resistance? A visual guide from WebMD.com.

Type 1 diabetics can have insulin resistance (IR) too. My IR was diagnosed in 1998. That was 53 years after my diagnosis with diabetes. I have used Metformin to help me with my IR. Many T1D's have IR. Here is the slide show on IR.

http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/ss/slideshow-insulin-resistance?ecd=wnl_dia_103115&ctr=wnl-dia-103115_nsl-ld-stry_title&mb=UMJ%40CFgbw6kMs2%2fs8NsB%2feHnVev1imbCtuIN8LuideU%3d