Thursday, October 12, 2017

Type 1 Diabetes 1900-1950

Dr. Joslin's article, Type 1, 1900-1950
Dr. Elliott Joslin wrote the following article in 1950. It gives a report on Type 1 diabetes for the years 1900-1950. It is very interesting to be able to compare the now with the then while reading this article. The first 21 years covered by the article were before insulin was discovered.Type 1 diabetics, and others, should find the article very interesting...rather startling, too!
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2037674/pdf/brmedj03598-0003.pdf

Monday, September 25, 2017

Type 1 Diabetes Study

I was diagnosed in 1945, and I have been type 1 for 72 years. I do not have diabetes related complications, except for some neuropathy. How is that possible? I don't know. It could be good genes. My last name has Celtic and Welsh origin, and there are many Vaughn's in Ireland. Maybe my good fortune is the luck of the Irish. 
There is a Facebook group called "The Joslin Medalists". It is a secret group. (Shhhh, don't tell anybody!) All the members there have been type 1 for at least 50 years, and they have Joslin 50 year medals. There are more than 5000 people who have been awarded that medal, and a great majority of us do not have any serious diabetes complications. We can't all be Irish, so there must be some other explanation. lol
The Joslin Medalist Study is attempting to find the factors that have enabled us to have type 1 for so long, without serious complications. Dr King, head of the study, in Boston, says there is some kind of special inner protection that many of us have that keeps our eyes, kidneys and nervous systems healthy. Many of you type 1 people here are very likely to have that inner protection, too. Dr. King also said that our hearts do not benefit from that protection, so he advised us to take very good care of our hearts!
Some progress has been made on pinpointing this inner protection. The study, 2005-2017, has thoroughly examined 1020 medalists. I participated in 2009, and again in June of this year. In the days ahead I am going to post some of the results found with this study.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Lilly the Insulin Doll

Have you heard of Lilly, the insulin doll? In the early 1920s the Lilly insulin company supplied free insulin to a group of children being cared for by Dr Elliot Joslin. At Christmas time, the children thanked Mr J K Lilly for the gift of the life saving insulin by sending him a personal letter. Mr Lilly was very touched by the letter, and he sent each child a new doll, and a new insulin kit. Each child named their dolls Lilly. There is a picture below showing Dr Joslin with one of the children.
The doll shown was created to celebrate the 77'th anniversary of the discovery of insulin. I could not find a picture of the original doll sent to the children by Mr Lilly.
There was also a much more recent attempt to have a "Diabetes Barbie" doll created. One of my Facebook friends was successful in getting that done. You can google "Diabetic Barbie" and see the result of that attempt.



Sunday, September 3, 2017

80 Years With Type 1 in the UK

This man received the HG Wells medal for living with type 1 diabetes for 80 years in the UK. "Mr Whittaker, 88, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was eight-years-old, was presented with the award by Diabetes UK." He was the first person to receive this medal. H G Wells co-founded the Diabetic Association, now known as Diabetes UK, with Dr Robert Lawrence in 1934.
The Joslin Diabetes Center also awards an 80 year medal in the US. I will be eligible for mine in 2026.

http://diabetestimes.co.uk/8971-2/#sthash.yddNnFEP.dpbs

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Saturday, August 26, 2017

The Cleveland Bros, Long Lives With Type 1

Type 1 folks who lived to a ripe old age are not so unusual now. Even in the early 1900s, just a few years after insulin was discovered, there were people diagnosed who lived into their 80's and 90's.
Bob Cleveland was diagnosed in 1925 when he was 5, and lived until he was 89.
Bob's brother, Gerald, was diagnosed in 1934 when he was 18, and lived until he was 93.
These brothers really inspire me. I was diagnosed in 1945, when I was 6, and have been type 1 for 71 years. The tools available and the knowledge for diabetes management are so much better now. When I read about people like the Cleveland brothers, it makes me feel I might live to be 100, or more. I need heroes, too. :)

Here is the story of Bob and Gerald Cleveland:
http://www.diabetes.co.uk/blog/2015/06/diabetes-legends-the-cleveland-brothers/